In memory of our ancestors, who, through long ages, came to this well and here, in simple faith, made prayers and vows with humble offerings. So this became a holy place.
At   one   time   the   Isle   of   Man   had   hundreds   of   wells   and   springs   that   people visited   regularly   and   drew   water   from.      Some   were   domestic   wells   used   by   a family    or    small    community,    others    were    sacred    springs    where    rituals    and offerings were made. In    the    19th    century    in    particular,    records    show    that    some    of    these    sacred springs     and     wells     were     deliberately     destroyed     by     tenant     farmers     and landowners   along   with   tumulii   and   other   antiquities   and   now,   either   through neglect   or   because   there   is   no-one   alive   who   knows   their   location   and   they   are no   longer   visited   and   tended,   more   are   in   danger   of      being   lost   for   good.      With domestic   wells   in   particular,   the   arrivial   of   mains   water   meant   that   many   were either abandoned or filled in.
These   wells   and   springs   were   an   important   and   vital   part   of   Manx   life.      Many were    visited    daily,    helping    sustain    people    and    animals,    others    held    special reverence   and   were   visited   on   particular   days   of   the   year   or   for   their   renowned healing properties when people were ill. Records   tell   us   some   were   not   just   known   as   places   of   healing,   but   were   places of   cursing,   divination   and   wish-granting   and   occasionally   we   read   of   one   having a spirit associated with it too.  Too    many    locations    have    now    been    fogotten    or    overlooked    and    their importance   is   either   not   recognised   or   fading.      The   Isle   of   Man   Wells’   Project would like to rectify this.
Do   you   have   a   domestic   well   on   your   property?      We   are   compiling   a   register   of domestic   wells   whether   still   in   use   or   filled   in   and   purely   ornamental.      Location details can be kept confidential or made public, whichever you prefer.
Have   you   visisted   a   spring   or   holy   well   recently?      If   so   please   consider   sharing your    findings    with    us    so    we    can    maintain    an    up-to-date    record    of    their condition.      Photographs,   video   or   a   short   description   of   your   experience   is   very useful.
Surveying a domestic well at Smeale Farm © Lynne Beattie Domestic well at Smeale Farm © Lynne Beattie
to research and provide a modern record of all known springs and wells deemed important by our Ancestors to attempt to find some of those now thought lost to reinstate some and accord them the recognition they deserve to raise awareness of their existence to seek ongoing maintenance for their care and preservation
Chibbyr Catreeney (St Catherine's Well), Arbory © Sam Hudson Chibbyr Pherick, Lonan © Sam Hudson Chibbyr Catreeney (St Catherine's Well), Port Erin © MNH Original location of Chibbyr Catreeney (St Catherine's Well), Port Erin © MNH Chibbyr Feeayr (Cold Well), Grenaby © Ber Weyde Chibbyr-y-Wurra (Mary's Well), St Anthony's Church, Onchan © Ber Weyde
We   are   looking   for   volunteers   to   work with   us   in   locating   and   surveying   some wells.      If   you   think   you   can   help   please contact    Ber    Weyde    who    can    provide more    information    and    survey    forms.      Thank you.
262200
© 2017 Isle of Man Wells    |  All Rights Reserved    |    Website by TANTARA   
How to Share With Just Friends

How to share with just friends.

Posted by Isle of Man Wells on Sunday, July 31, 2017
© MNH

© 2017 isle of Man Wells |  All Rights Reserved  |  Website by TANTARA 

At   one   time   the   Isle   of   Man   had   hundreds   of   wells   and   springs   that people   visited   regularly   and   drew   water   from.      Some   were   domestic wells   used   by   a   family   or   small   community,   others   were   sacred   springs where rituals and offerings were made. In   the   19th   century   in   particular,   records   show   that   some   of   these sacred    springs    and    wells    were    deliberately    destroyed    by    tenant farmers   and   landowners   along   with   tumulii   and   other   antiquities   and now,   either   through   neglect   or   because   there   is   no-one   alive   who knows   their   location   and   they   are   no   longer   visited   and   tended,   more are    in    danger    of        being    lost    for    good.        With    domestic    wells    in particular,   the   arrivial   of   mains   water   meant   that   many   were   either abandoned or filled in.
These   wells   and   springs   were   an   important   and   vital   part   of   Manx life.      Many   were   visited   daily,   helping   sustain   people   and   animals, others   held   special   reverence   and   were   visited   on   particular   days of   the   year   or   for   their   renowned   healing   properties   when   people were ill. Records   tell   us   some   were   not   just   known   as   places   of   healing,   but were     places     of     cursing,     divination     and     wish-granting     and occasionally we read of one having a spirit associated with it too.  Too   many   locations   have   now   been   fogotten   or   overlooked   and their   importance   is   either   not   recognised   or   fading.      The   Isle   of Man Wells’ Project would like to rectify this.
“Almost    invariably    there    was    a    spring    or    a gentle   stream   nearby   every   Keeill.   It   served   the purpose   of   baptism   and   retained   the   respect associated     with     it     in     pagan     times.     It     is regrettable   that   so   many   of   them,   linked   for long   ages   with   the   religious   aspirations   of   our people,        should        have        been        wantonly destroyed.”
William Cubbon ~ Journalist, Librarian and Director of the Manx Museum
to   research   and   provide   a   modern   record   of   all   known springs and wells deemed important by our Ancestors to attempt to find some of those now thought lost to   reinstate   some   and   accord   them   the   recognition   they deserve to raise awareness of their existence to     seek     ongoing     maintenance     for     their     care     and preservation
Do   you   have   a   domestic   well   on   your   property?      We   are   compiling   a   register   of domestic   wells   whether   still   in   use   or   filled   in   and   purely   ornamental.      Location details can be kept confidential or made public, whichever you prefer.
Have   you   visisted   a   spring   or   holy   well   recently?      If   so   please   consider   sharing your    findings    with    us    so    we    can    maintain    an    up-to-date    record    of    their condition.      Photographs,   video   or   a   short   description   of   your   experience   is   very useful.
Surveying a domestic well at Smeale Farm © Lynne Beattie Domestic well at Smeale Farm © Lynne Beattie Chibbyr Catreeney (St Catherine's Well), Arbory © Sam Hudson Chibbyr Pherick, Lonan © Sam Hudson Chibbyr Feeayr (Cold Well), Grenaby © Ber Weyde Chibbyr-y-Wurra (Mary's Well), St Anthony's Church, Onchan © Ber Weyde
262200
We   are   looking   for   volunteers   to   work with   us   in   locating   and   surveying   some wells.      If   you   think   you   can   help   please contact    Ber    Weyde    who    can    provide more    information    and    survey    forms.      Thank you.
How to Share With Just Friends

How to share with just friends.

Posted by Isle of Man Wells on Sunday, July 31, 2017
© MNH
Isle of Man Wells
Chibbraghyn  Vannin  
Isle of Man Wells
Chibbraghyn  Vannin